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Once again you have really pulled through. I heard that you are the best and I can see for myself you are.
CC
Cisco
We use Tigerfish Air to get our transcripts in around an hour. From start to finish the process is seamless and that sure makes my life a lot easier!
HT Intel
Can't tell you how much we have enjoyed using Tigerfish. Each time I've called you in a pinch I've been able to talk to a real voice. That's huge.
BO, Presentation Strategies
I have come to expect excellent service and a great value from Tigerfish over the years. I’m pleased with the ease of use and the quick turnaround. Overall, I remain really pleased.

MB Haas, Jr. Fund
You guys were terrific. We were very happy with the customer service, the quick turnaround and the quality of the transcription.

AL, The California Wellness Foundation
Once again you have really pulled through. I heard that you are the best and I can see for myself you are.
CC
Cisco

Subtitling and Transcription Services Part 3

 

What is transcription?  And what do subtitling and transcription services have to do with each other?   This is part of a series of posts on the myriad uses and types of transcription, brought to you by Tigerfish Transcribing, experts at transcribing audio to text, video to text, transcribing interviews, focus group meetings, medical and legal transcription, and best transcription services for Chicago, New York, Seattle and the San Francisco Bay Area.

 

Time Takes Space:  The Art of Subtitling

In the world of subtitles, time takes up space.  That’s what happens when you transcribe audible words to visible ones.  The longer it takes to hear a dialogue or soliloquy,  the more space it will need on screen.  Subtitling and transcription are intertwined; stark choices must be made when editing the transcript that becomes the visible soundtrack.

In general, subtitles are kept to 40 or 45 characters per line, and lines are displayed for one and a half seconds.  You could think of subtitles as extreme edited transcripts:  reading is so much slower than hearing that often a film’s dialogue is cut by more than a third!

As in editing other kinds of transcripts, the transcriber and the subtitler have to make decisions about overlapping speakers and when it is important to include interjections.  The subtitler needs to know the plot of the film in order to decide what to include and what to cut, just as a transcript editor needs to know the subject and purpose of a recording in order to provide the client with exactly the transcript they need.

 

Jason Avery

The Wide World of Transcription