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Once again you have really pulled through. I heard that you are the best and I can see for myself you are.
CC
Cisco
We use Tigerfish Air to get our transcripts in around an hour. From start to finish the process is seamless and that sure makes my life a lot easier!
HT Intel
Can't tell you how much we have enjoyed using Tigerfish. Each time I've called you in a pinch I've been able to talk to a real voice. That's huge.
BO, Presentation Strategies
I have come to expect excellent service and a great value from Tigerfish over the years. I’m pleased with the ease of use and the quick turnaround. Overall, I remain really pleased.

MB Haas, Jr. Fund
You guys were terrific. We were very happy with the customer service, the quick turnaround and the quality of the transcription.

AL, The California Wellness Foundation
Once again you have really pulled through. I heard that you are the best and I can see for myself you are.
CC
Cisco

Transcription Questions and Answers from Tigerfish Transcribing:

What is the difference between captions and subtitles?

In film transcription, corporate television transcription, industrial video transcription, educational television transcription, and documentary video transcription, the best transcription services are needed to provide video to text transcripts used for closed captions, subtitles, live captions, and myriad other uses.

 

Open captioning

In case, like me, you’ve wondered why ‘closed captioning’ isn’t just called ‘captioning’, here is the answer:  closed captioning means you can turn it off and on, while open captioning, also called burned or baked-in captioning, is always visible.

 

Subtitles

There is not a hard line distinguishing subtitling from captioning, but in general subtitling refers to text that is used to cross a language or dialect barrier, while captioning is text used to cross a hearing barrier.  Subtitles are therefore less likely to include text representing non-linguistic sounds (for example, “doorbell ringing”), and more likely to include translations of written text that appears in the video (for example, a newspaper headline in another language).  Sometimes captioning is called ‘subtitling for the hearing impaired.’

 
Jason Avery

Local Color

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